SUMMER FANCY FOOD SHOW 2017

SUMMER FANCY FOOD SHOW 2017, Javitas Center, New York

Darjeeling tea

Darjeeling tea is renowned globally for its distinctive Muscatel flavour, which cannot be replicated anywhere else in the world. Assam tea is globally reputed for its full bodied, deep-amber liquor with a brisk, strong and malty taste. Nilgiri tea has its own unique character - it leaves a creamy taste in the mouth with notes of dusk flowers.

Darjeeling tea

Darjeeling tea is renowned globally for its distinctive Muscatel flavour, which cannot be replicated anywhere else in the world. Assam tea is globally reputed for its full bodied, deep-amber liquor with a brisk, strong and malty taste. Nilgiri tea has its own unique character - it leaves a creamy taste in the mouth with notes of dusk flowers.

Tea
coffee
spice

The intelligent aroma of tea

Angshuman Paul , Tea-entrepreneur & tea estate owner, Girish Chandra Tea Estate, A.C Paul Agricultural Company

91661061.jpg,Tea-entrepreneur & tea estate owner, Girish Chandra Tea Estate, A.C Paul Agricultural Company

History has often alluded to a confounding correlation between tea and intellect. Such a legacy doesn't mean that addle-headed people (like me) do not drink tea. But the tea cup has certainly captivated a number of charismatic, deft and diplomatic people over the ages.

Among those I know or have read about, the legendary Charles Dickens comes to my memory first. His passion for tea drinking is quite easily evident on a visit to the Charles Dickens Museum (his house in Doughty Street, London). Let me introduce to you to how tea features often in the work of this great nineteenth century author.

His books make it clear that tea-drinking was ubiquitous among the working classes of his time, and through the eyes of Pip, the hero of Great Expectations, we can sense Dickens' affection for it, "...we returned into the Castle, where we found Miss Skiffins preparing tea. The responsibility of making toast was delegated to the Aged [an elderly man]... The Aged prepared such a haystack of buttered toast, that I could scarcely see him over it... while Miss Skiffins prepared such a jorum of tea, that the pig in the back premises became strongly excited... We ate the whole of the toast, and drank tea in proportion, and it was delightful to see how warm and greasy we all got after it.'

There's more. In Oliver Twist - another outstanding orphan protagonist created by Dickens, the narrative takes us through the precise tea-making ceremony of Ms Corney, the matron of the workhouse, to display her self-satisfaction, and she is wooed over a cup of tea by the tyrannical and inquisitive beadle, Mr Bumble, who, when she has left the room, inspects her tea-making equipment to check that it is genuine silver. In fact it's even said that Dickens rejuvenated himself from the sadness of being separated from his wife with the help of tea. The sheer joy of drinking tea has been often fabricated into the gripping stories of intellectual investigators like Sherlock Holmes.

I think almost all the heritage clubs in India serve tea, especially in cities like Mumbai & Kolkata, where these heritage clubs used to be the rendezvous of writers and tea wooed them. The vibrant Satyajit Ray is known for how he loved spending his time indulging in his tea addiction at the Coffee House in College Street of Kolkata. A number of brilliant writers were tea drinkers. Another instance is Tarini Khuro, an aged bachelor living at College Street in Kolkata, who was a very efficient story-teller. But at the commencement of his stories, he needed a strong cup of tea that cheered him up enough to be able to convince his listeners on all his exaggerations. It may also be observed here that the heroes created by eminent Bengali authors like Premendra Mitra are often found to rely on tea to energise them when they embark on a narration of their adventures. It is also interesting to note that a get together over tea often tends to revolve around intellectual discussions.

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Oct 162014

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