Indian coffees

With mystical beginnings in the 17th century, Indian coffees are appreciated globally - both for their unique taste characteristics and for the environment friendly practices that the country's coffee planters have persisted with over time. Intercropping with different types of spices provides interesting subtleties to these coffees that have won them widespread acclaim.

Indian coffees

With mystical beginnings in the 17th century, Indian coffees are appreciated globally - both for their unique taste characteristics and for the environment friendly practices that the country's coffee planters have persisted with over time. Intercropping with different types of spices provides interesting subtleties to these coffees that have won them widespread acclaim.

Tea
coffee
spice

The coffee & genes conundrum

Ms Sangeetha Shankar , Consulting Editor, Indian Coffee magazine

1422542939078.jpg,Consulting Editor, Indian Coffee magazine

Have you often wondered that your neighbour is perfectly happy without savouring coffee, but your day is never perfect if you have not guzzled enough cups of coffee to keep you going through the day; the genes you carry; could be to blame.

Earlier research had already identified 2 genes that influenced coffee intake. But a new research published in Molecular Psychiatry has identified 6 more genes in humans that can be associated with increased intake of coffee. The research was led by Harvard School of Public Health and Brigham and Women’s Hospital which are part of caffeine and genetics consortium contributing to the study.

The study was conducted based on coffee consumption data of about 120,000 participants of European and African – American ancestry and the reaction of their genes to caffeine consumption. The analysis was made by scrutinising the way genes reacted to caffeine intake; its stimulating effects and also the way a human body would process caffeine.

However the research indicates that the impact of the genes on increased coffee intake is 0.03–0.14 cups per day which means that the proportional impact of genes on coffee intake is quite minimal.

The research is important in the sense that it would allow nutritionists to tailor the coffee intake of people based on their different genetic responses to caffeine consumption. "Coffee and caffeine have been linked to beneficial and adverse health effects. Our findings may allow us to identify subgroups of people most likely to benefit from increasing or decreasing coffee consumption for optimal health," said Marilyn Cornelis, research associate in the Department of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health and lead author of the study.

Source: Harvard School of Public Health & Molecular Psychiatry

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Aug 122015

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