Indian coffees

With mystical beginnings in the 17th century, Indian coffees are appreciated globally - both for their unique taste characteristics and for the environment friendly practices that the country's coffee planters have persisted with over time. Intercropping with different types of spices provides interesting subtleties to these coffees that have won them widespread acclaim.

Indian coffees

With mystical beginnings in the 17th century, Indian coffees are appreciated globally - both for their unique taste characteristics and for the environment friendly practices that the country's coffee planters have persisted with over time. Intercropping with different types of spices provides interesting subtleties to these coffees that have won them widespread acclaim.

Tea
coffee
spice

#DIY: Make Super Filter Kaapi At Home

INSIDER STORY

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There are few things in life that I find more comforting, or feel more strongly about than a morning cup of filter kaapi. Looking back to the days when I lived away from home, shamelessly consuming lattes on the go, I realised that if anything, this was all the more reason to learn how to brew a perfect cup of kaapi. Just like my paati used to make, and then a generation after her, my periammas and my own mother. 
 
So when I moved back to South India a couple years back, and set about the task of stocking my own kitchen, a filter coffee set complete with it’s inverted umbrella like filter, a pan, and a couple davara-tumbler sets were among my first investments. 
 
Next came the process of making the coffee. Here are a few tricks from mother’s own kitchen:
 
  • You can grind your own coffee, but store bought versions are often equally delightful, and generally, roasted and ground with more precision and efficiency than your own kitchen can handle. These things come with experience. Trust in the wisdom of kitchens that are older than yours, and buy your filter coffee ready made. The roasting, blend and grind of the coffee differs from house to house. Find one that is neither too fine, nor too coarse, only medium; and voila, you’ll find, like magic, that your decoction has perfect consistency.
  • The defining characteristics of a good filter kaapi are its aroma, body and a delectable patina on the palate. 
  • Make sure you store your coffee in airtight containers, and shelve them away in a cool dark spot in your kitchen. Coffee can become stale. Like most spices and edibles it is susceptible to damp. Storing your coffee right, is key to preserving its flavor in the long run.
  • 3 tablespoons of finely ground coffee powder with 3/4th cup water makes the perfect amount of decoction for a cup of medium-to-strong coffee. 
  • Don’t burn the coffee. Bring the water to full boil, then set it to cool a little. Press the powder down firmly with your filter and trickle the water gently down the spine of the filter. Almost boiling water, means that your coffee will be delightfully free of that slightly burnt aroma that we encounter, oh-so-often with cups of mediocre coffee.
  • Once you are done heating milk with sugar in a saucepan, add the decoction to the mix. Good filter kaapi is shaken not stirred! So pour the coffee back and forth between saucepan and your tumbler-davara to cool it down, and watch in delight as it also simultaneously aerates itself and froths.
 
And you are done! Many happy filter kaapi filled mornings to you.

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Feb 222017

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