Spices from India

Spices from India have been the soul of global cuisine since time immemorial. Indians have been well versed with growing spices and also with their culinary and medicinal applications much before the rest of the world. The lure of these spices has led to historic explorations, wars and conquests and the country continues to retain its stature as the Spice Bowl of the World.

Spices from India

Spices from India have been the soul of global cuisine since time immemorial. Indians have been well versed with growing spices and also with their culinary and medicinal applications much before the rest of the world. The lure of these spices has led to historic explorations, wars and conquests and the country continues to retain its stature as the Spice Bowl of the World.

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5 Reasons Why Garlic Should Be Part of Your Diet

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Getting to know your spices and using them liberally in your kitchen is probably one of the best ways to start eating healthy. In a country like India the quality, quantity, diversity and sheer variety of spices available at ones fingertips is mind-boggling: so count your blessings, and make the most of it as soon as you can get started!

Today for instance we’re dishing on why Garlic should be a staple in your cooking. Yes of course it keeps vampires away, but it can also keep heart troubles, fluctuations in blood pressure, even the common cold – to which there is famously no cure – at bay. Ta dah!

Did you know, for instance –

1. Garlic Contains a Compound Called Allicin, With Potent Healing Powers: Ancient civilizations including the Egyptians, Babylonians, Greeks, Romans and the Chinese used garlic liberally in their cuisine not for it’s strong flavors and aromas, but in fact because garlic is said to possess serious medicinal properties doing wonders for everything from your hair and skin even helping with curing the common cold.

2. Despite Being Highly Nutritious, It Has Very Few Calories:  Just 28 grams serving of garlic contains Manganese, Vitamin B6, Vitamin C, Selenium, Fiber, calcium, copper, potassium, phosphorus, iron and vitamin B1! Garlic also contains trace amounts of various other nutrients – boggles the mind doesn’t it? In fact, at just 42 calories per serving it contains a little bit of almost everything we need.

3. Eating Garlic Can Help Detoxify Heavy Metals in the Body: At high doses, the sulfur compounds in garlic have been shown to protect against organ damage from heavy metal toxicity. Clinical signs of toxicity, including headaches and blood pressure, were also shown to be reduced. Three doses of garlic everyday outperformed even the drug D-penicillamine in symptom reduction!

4. Garlic Contains Antioxidants That May Help Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia: Garlic with it’s liberal dosages of antioxidants support the body’s protective mechanisms against oxidative damage,  down the aging process. The combined effects that garlic has on reducing cholesterol and blood pressure, as well as its antioxidant properties, may even help prevent common brain diseases like Alzheimer’s and dementia.

5. Garlic Might Help You Live Longer: Given the beneficial effects that garlic has on important risk factors like blood pressure and cholesterol (which in turn impacts the health of your heart), it is fairly logical to say that garlic probably has an impact on human life and it’s longevity. Garlic also fends of infections which can be a common cause of death especially with those who suffer from anti immune disorders or who are older in age.

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Nov 062017

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